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TV Show Review: True Detective Season 1 on Hotstar

TV ShowTrue Detective
GenreCrime Mystery Drama
LanguagesEnglish
TNS Score90.66
Run-Time50m-60m
No. of Episodes8
No. of Seasons3
Original NetworkHBO
Cast
Matthew McConaughey, Woody Harrelson, Michelle Monaghan, and Michael Potts
CreatorNic Pizzolatto

Plot:

The series essentially revolves around detectives, solving mysteries while facing their own demons and those of the people around them. Season one nevertheless stands out for its articulate deliverance on screen. In this season we have Detective Rust Cohl, who comes out as nothing less than a mystery for his partner Martin Hart. In the show we see them recalling their respective versions of a serial murder case they solved, years ago. Rust had quit the job a couple of months after the case and Martin was now running a private detective company. While they had decided to go separate ways, they were brought together to solve the case that was apparently left incomplete.

The storage room scenes are great with respect to the narrative. They are also the scenes that show how our two favourite detectives unite and form a force against the serial killer, who’s still alive out there.

Writing:

The narrative is forceful and heavy, in the best way. It pushes us to think beyond our capacities and understandings, much like Martin Hart. It’s written very well, in terms of flow and pace of the story. What is hard to make sense of, in the first ten minutes becomes the most intriguing twist of the story.

Just when these two detectives are shown in the present describing the events of the past, we realise that they separated and it therefore becomes essential and critical for us to know, why they chose to separate. In terms of the serial-killer narrative that forms a common base for their re-connect; we realise that the curiosity to know who the killer is, will persist till the end. With every layer, the intrigue and curiosity increases.

Direction:

The show has been directed really well. The direction compliments the refined layering in the narrative and brings what is essential, on the screen. It is fair yet unusual to say that there are multiple climaxes in the series, especially season one. The final climax, nevertheless, stands out.

It somehow wraps up the entire season in a package, along with giving a metaphorical recap of what the detectives had gone through, while solving the mystery right from the beginning. The directional brilliance is at its peak in this last scene, when we see Rust chasing the killer and Martin, chasing Rust.

Performance:

Mathew McConaughey’s artistic excellence is not unknown, his character of Rust Cohl, can be called one of his best works. The psychological dilemma of the character, comes out on the screen through his expressions and McConaughey has done it beautifully well. Some of his best scenes are the ones in which he’s in conversation with the two young detectives. Woody Harrelson has done a great job in characterising Marin Hart.

The hypocrisy and corruption of the character is visible in his demeaner that Woody brings out and by the end of the series, his pathos is also visible. Michelle Monaghan’s character of Maggie Hart, has a brilliant presence on screen along with all the other characters.

Reception:

The series received positive reviews from critics and was cited as one of the strongest dramas of the 2014 television season. It was a candidate for numerous television awards, including a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Drama Series and a Golden Globe Award for Best Miniseries or Television Film, and won several other honors for writing, cinematography, direction, and acting.

Conclusion:

In all, the show stands true to its title and we’re able to see the work of the ‘True Detectives.’ The continuation of the show and raising level of suspense, makes it all the more worth it. You can’t miss watching specifically the first season, for its brilliance in plot, direction, screenplay and performance. You’d fall in love with the character of Rust, and that we can assure.

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